Title Sponsor

Surface Pro 6

UK: Parliament braces itself for biggest showdown in history

UK: Parliament braces itself for biggest showdown in history
By: NewsDesk Team
City of London Newsroom




Parliament braces itself for the biggest showdown in history as Boris Johnson faces a showdown in the Commons which could lead to a snap general election if rebel MPs seize control of parliamentary proceedings and contra his proroguing.

Parliament returns today after recess, with a cross-party group of MPs aiming to take charge of Commons business to allow them to debate legislation to block a no-deal Brexit despite threats that they would be "expelled"

Last night [Monday, 2nd September] Johnson addressed the nation outside Number 10 insisting that he didn't want an election and telling the UK voters that neither did they, however, Government grandees said that any bid to "wreck" the UK's negotiating position would prompt a motion for an early election.

Never before in the history has the august body been blackmailed into a "tow he party line or else" scenario prompting senior Tory grandees Philip Hammond and Justin Greening to issue counter threats with Greening saying that she would not be standing as a Conservative candidate at the next election.

Top Tory Philip Hammond, (who was re-selected by local members last night [Monday,  3rd September]) vowed to fight on to be the Tory candidate if MPs agree on Tuesday to allow the cross-party group to seize control of  Commons business, the formal legislation of which will be considered the following day.

Sources close to the group of rebel Conservative MPs opposed to a no-deal Brexit are quoted as saying "It's a bit rich for the Prime Minister to point the finger at colleagues who plan to defy the party whip - colleagues who voted for a deal three times - while he voted with Jeremy Corbyn to inflict the two biggest parliamentary defeats on a government in British history.

Under the terms of the European Union (Withdrawal) (no 6) Bill, the Government must seek a delay to the UK's withdrawal from the EU until January 31 if there is no agreement with Brussels in place by October 19 and Parliament has not approved a no-deal Brexit.




Post a comment

0 Comments